May 9, 2018

MATH

Focus Headline of the Week:  Teachers must know what success looks like at the end of a block, the end of a day, the end of a unit, the end of a term, and the end of the year to coach students successfully.

 

Resources of the Week – Math Fact Fluency!

Check out the resources below to provide additional fluency practice opportunities and help students finish the year with the skills they need to hit the ground running next year.

Math Facts Pro

Factmonster Flash Cards

Math Minute – Online Fast Facts

Math Facts Basketball

Printable Flash Cards

 

 

ELA

Focus Headline of the Week:  We must live the belief that students get better at reading and writing, by reading and writing.

 

Resources of the Week – Writing Prompts!

We know our readers get better by reading– our writers get better by writing! Are you looking for an easy way to infuse more writing practice across your day? Check out these writing prompts that can be used as a quick center, morning work, or brain break!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SCIENCE

Focus Headline of the Week:  Making students aware of cross-cutting concepts helps make sense of the world, across many different areas of Science.

 

Patterns: A Cross-Cutting Concept in Science

Science is full of ideas that span more than just a single topic.  Take the idea of cycles, for example. There are cycles in the cell that break down food and give you energy.  There are cycles in how the moon, sun, stars, and planets move. There are cycles in how energy travels through ecosystems.  The NGSS standards refer to these types of ideas that span more than one area “Cross-Cutting Concepts” (CCCs). Other examples of CCCs include “Structure and Function” and “Cause and Effect.” Making students aware of these ideas when they come up helps students make sense of the world.  Below is an example of how Emily P made one CCC clear for her students.

Emily’s students were going to struggle a bit to interpret a graph about how temperatures change over the seasons.  She knew this. Just looking at the graph on the left, you might think temperatures go up, then go down. End of story.

But no!  It’s a cycle!  So, Emily made a chart (to the right) to help students make the connection that seasons are a cycle that repeat year after year.  During the discussion, she asked the right questions, getting students to recognize the pattern as a cycle.

 

But no!  It’s a cycle!  So, Emily made a chart (to the right) to help students make the connection that seasons are a cycle that repeat year after year.  During the discussion, she asked the right questions, getting students to recognize the pattern as a cycle.

When it came time to write about the graph, students nailed it (see example on the left).  They consistently described not just how the temperature changed over the year, but the fact that this is a pattern, a cycle, that repeats every year.  Job well done.

A Resource for Cross-Cutting Concepts

To help students make connections to Scientific ideas across topics, check out this great resource: sentence stems and question prompts for each major cross-cutting concept in Science.